The Richmond Public Library, A Uniting Force

Behind an old-fashioned latch door, lies a whole other world brimming with stories yet to be told and lessons not yet learned. Originally built more than a hundred and sixty years ago, the building that the Richmond public library currently inhabits has been rebuilt many times. The devotion to education that first prompted its construction in 1850, though, has withstood the test of time. From being first used as a schoolhouse, over the years it has undergone numerous transformations the most recent being, in 1962, when it was finally converted into a library. Continue reading The Richmond Public Library, A Uniting Force

Featured Business: Troy Power Sports

In New England, the winters are long and the summers are short. Every winter brings inches to feet of white powdery snow which covers miles and miles of land. And when spring time comes around, the snow melts giving this time of year the title “mud season.” So it should not take anyone by surprise how rapturous New Englanders can be about snowmobiles and four wheelers because in this region it is their form of entertainment. Continue reading Featured Business: Troy Power Sports

Durum Farming in North Dakota

If you were ever to visit North Dakota, you would find miles of flat, dry land, and few trees. When you drive down the dusty dirt road, you will pass acres of golden wheat and sunflowers rippling in the breeze, which almost always blows. You would also start to notice how the number of crops outnumber the people living in that rural area.

One of the most prominent crops grown in North Dakota is durum, a type of wheat used to make pasta. Durum I one of the twelve different crops growing in that area.

Rodney Sjol, a farmer who specializes in durum farming, recalls his days in farming durum on the former family farm. He says, “ You can grow other stuff, but that’s what I grow.” There is irony in the fact that two of his few grandchildren are now allergic to the crop he once grew.

Sjol clearly remembers the ins and outs of durum farming. “What we did was dry land farming.” He than goes on to explain the difference between dry land farming and wet land farming. For dry land farming, “You count on Mother Nature to supply the rain when you need it and to shut it off when you need it too.” Wet land farming is using irrigation to water the crops. “It ain’t necessarily harder, just riskier. “But,” he points out, “Land ain’t as expensive when ya dry land farm.”

“Percolating” is the term that explains the process of using irrigation to water the land. Some farmers do not use the method of wet land farming because the land is not fit. “Irrigation could ruin your soil,” says Sjol. Another reason it is not always used is because there might not be a source of water nearby, and it is not possible to drill a well for the purpose of watering the crops.

The family farm was between Parshall and New Town. Although Rodney Sjol is retired, he still takes great interest in what is going on on the farm. “This year they tried growin’ them soybeans, canola, durum, barley, and he tried growing some flax,” says Sjol in response as to what the current residents of the farm were growing. This is a big difference as to what was originally grown on the farm. Sjol talked about how he only grew durum. “Well, I didn’t have livestock, and you can’t grow durum in the winter, so, yeah, I didn’t do much for farming.

He then explained the whole process. The tractor is used to till up the land and get it ready to seed. Then the farmer goes through with the seeder which is hooked up to an air grill. The air grill picks up the seeds from the seeder and shoots the seeds into the ground after it creates an air pocket for them. It is then worked into the ground. After th growing season, it is collected by a combine which separates the seeds from the stalks. Some of it is loaded into trucks and brought to a machine called the elevator, which cleans it up and brings, typically, to Minnesota were it is ground up and made into pasta.

If it is not brought directly to the elevator, it can be stored in grain bins and saved for next year’s seed.

The process of farming durum can be a lot of work, but the payoff helps, not only to make a living, but also provides food for millions of Americans.

Featured College: Saint Anselm’s

College application season has once again dropped anchor and as every responsible student knows, one of the most important parts of the application process is research. To this end, the Observer has compiled an assortment of information on several noteworthy institutions. One, in particular, is Saint Anselm College of liberal arts. Located in Manchester, New Hampshire, Saint Anselm’s was founded in 1889 by a group of Benedictine monks. Since then the campus has expanded to 380 acres and, over the years, has hosted at least ten US presidents. Continue reading Featured College: Saint Anselm’s

Chouinard Speaks about Secular Hell, Real Heaven

Mr. Martin Chouinard, graduate of the Thomas Moore College of Liberal Arts and now teacher at the I.H.M. school, spoke at this year’s S.B.C. conference about Our Lady’s Reply to the 20th Century Secularist Utopia. This was Mr. Chouinard’s first time speaking at the annual conference, which was held this past weekend. Continue reading Chouinard Speaks about Secular Hell, Real Heaven

A Look ‘Behind the Scenes’ of the SBC Conference

On October 6 and 7 , the annual conference held by Saint Benedict Center, took place. The conference is an event for Catholics to gather and enjoy each other’s company while learning about the faith, but in order for this blessed event to take place, many hours of planning and hard work are required by those people who are “behind the scenes” and are all too often taken for granted. Continue reading A Look ‘Behind the Scenes’ of the SBC Conference

Octogenarian Calls Audience to ‘Make America Catholic Again’

The 20th annual Saint Benedict Center conference took place in Richmond N.H., on Friday and Saturday, October 6 and 7, with the theme “A World view in the Light of Fatima.” One of the eight presentations of the two-day event was Gary Potter’s talk on the subject of “Russia, America, Fatima.” Continue reading Octogenarian Calls Audience to ‘Make America Catholic Again’

SBC Prior Speaks on Fatima as ‘A Vision of Happiness’

On Saturday of October 7, 2017, the second day of the annual Conference at the Saint Benedict Center (SBC) took place. The Conference is a two-day event, where speakers come and deliver talks on various subjects that all pertain to the theme of the Conference, and this year’s conference theme was “A World in the Light of Fatima”. This year, Brother André Marie, M.I.C.M., SBC’s Prior, took the stage and did a very informational talk titled “A Vision of Happiness.” Continue reading SBC Prior Speaks on Fatima as ‘A Vision of Happiness’

Conference Speaker, a Papal Knight, Promotes Reign of Christ the King

At the October 6 and 7 , 2017 Saint Benedict Center’s conference in Richmond New Hampshire, Charles Coulombe spoke on the subject of “The Reign of Two Hearts: The Kingship of Christ and the Queenship of Mary.” He talked about what a Christian country would look like and what the reign of the two hearts means. Continue reading Conference Speaker, a Papal Knight, Promotes Reign of Christ the King